PROTECT YOUR PETS FROM THE COLD!

Press Release

Are you enjoying these frigid temperatures? If the outdoors is too cold for you, then it’s too cold for your pets too. Animals need much more pampering during the winter months to battle the cold. Here are some tips to help keep your furry friends safe and healthy during the winter.

FEED! Animals tend to use more calories in the winter to keep themselves warm. This means they need to be fed more than usual in winter months in order to retain needed calories. They also need plenty of water to keep hydrated.

RELOCATE! You may consider moving the location of your pet’s bed to a warmer more comfortable place in the house. Extra blankets can also provide additional warmth for indoor sleeping areas.

DRESS THEM UP!  Pets with short legs are much closer to the ground and are more likely to get cold a lot faster because of being in such close contact with the snow. Short-coated pets also suffer more from the cold. Booties can protect your dog or cat from cold, wet conditions that could contribute to frostbite on their paws, while providing a barrier against harmful chemicals.

KNOW WHEN ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! When you get cold, you go inside, right? If you’re cold, then your dog probably is too. Limit long walks, and their time outside.

KEEP THEM AT HOME! Don't leave your pets in a cold car, it's like a refrigerator.

WIPE THEIR FEET! After you walk your pet, be sure you wipe their paws to get rid of the harsh salt and chemicals. Many of these may be poisonous if your pet ingests them.

PROVIDE SHELTER! If you must keep your pets outside for a long period of time, give them a comfortable, strong shelter to keep them warm and protect them from the wind. Search online for DIY ideas on how to create insulated pet shelters.

CHECK THE CAR! Outdoor cats often enjoy the warmth of recently used car engines but this can be deadly. Honk the horn and make sure your vehicle is clear of animals before leaving.

Be the set of hands that saves a set of paws.  For more information, please contact Christine Dzujna at 934-7163.