Gardener Recommends Lean Farm Philosophy

The Lean Farm by Ben Hartman; "6S"

By Lorna Carlisle

Soon the gardening season will begin – slowly at first, then building until we can’t keep up. For now, let’s take what can be a slow time for us and look for ways to improve our efficiency. I highly recommend The Lean Farm, by Ben Hartman. Lean philosophy is sometimes referred to as “6S” – […]

What Makes A Gardener? They Share Common Traits

Patience and hope are necessary traits

By Lorna Carlisle

Many gardeners share traits that make them well suited for gardening. We are a hopeful lot.  Who else would take a seed, that is sometimes the size of a pepper flake, put it in the soil and assume it will produce a plant?   Gardeners also have patience. We spend a lot of time waiting for […]

Autumn Offers Opportunities for Great Hikes in the Woods

Bugs are gone and ground is harder

By Ken Wells

As winter approaches, I’m looking forward to great hikes in the woods when the bugs are gone and soggy ground is frozen. Two forested hikes topping my list are the Mountain Brook trail, north of Elbow Pond in East Andover, and the Great Brook trail on Lakeshore Road near the northernmost end of Pleasant Lake. […]

Planning Next Year’s Garden

By Lorna Carlisle

Not Done Yet…. As of this writing, we have not had a frost. Many of you will still be harvesting vegetables and hopefully canning, freezing, drying or giving away produce. The bounty won’t last, so enjoy it while you can. Now is not the time to give up on your garden. What you do now […]

The Northern Rail Trail is a Real New Hampshire Gem

Local autumn travel

By Ken Wells
The Northern Rail Trail is a Real New Hampshire Gem

What is your favorite New England season? For lots of us, it’s autumn — the fantastic hues of foliage, the bountiful garden harvests and apple picking, the bug-free, warm days and cool nights. There are so many great things about autumn, and most of them involve the outdoors. Recently, I’ve had some pleasant conversations with […]

There’s Always Next Year

By Lorna Carlisle
There’s Always Next Year

This has to be one of the worst gardening years ever for many people. July and August were non-stop rain and clouds. The vegetables really struggled to fight off foliar diseases. Without at least two or three days of sunshine in a row, the plants were slow to grow or they died from too much […]

Eradicating Plant Pests Presents Summer Quandary

Hornworms, mosquitoes, Japanese beetles

By Lorna Carlisle, Beacon Volunteer
Eradicating Plant Pests Presents Summer Quandary

As a follow up to the last article in the August Beacon, Yes, a black light does work to find tomato hornworms.  Now if only it could help us find actual tomatoes! By now, everyone has probably had their worst gardening year in the last decade.  Tomatoes are as scarce as a sunny day this […]

Highland Lake Loon Chicks Thriving in Spite of Predators

They'll be five weeks old around September 1

By Donna Baker-Hartwell, Beacon Volunteer
Highland Lake Loon Chicks Thriving in Spite of Predators

By the time the September issue of the Beacon arrives at your door, the Highland Lake loon chicks will be five weeks old. They hatched on July 27 after 28 days of incubation. As I write this update, they are 17 days old and thriving. They are now too big for both chicks to sit […]

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